Fixing our foreign policy

Yesterday I wrote about the Alliance For Multilateralism which I believe is: Harmless, at worst; and Likely off to a shaky start because it already (see link above) includes a few (which is too many) countries which are either weak democracies or hardly democratic at all. That being said, Canada belongs in it because we … Continue reading Fixing our foreign policy

The Alliance for Multilateralism (AKA the committee to save the world)

A bit more than a year ago I discussed a proposal for a G-9 which was dubbed 'The Committee to Save the World Order.' Sometime later, I discussed how such a group, I called it a G-X, might displace the G-20. Now, I see that last September, France and Germany formed just such a group: … Continue reading The Alliance for Multilateralism (AKA the committee to save the world)

We need to do better

Shelly Hagan, Bloomberg's Ottawa based Canadian economics reporter, says, in a recent (7 Jan 20) article, that "Economists expect Canada and the U.S. to compete for the top spot for growth among the Group of Seven countries in 2020, yet the latest population data reveal the two nations have starkly different forces driving their expansions." … Continue reading We need to do better

Taiwan election

In a paper published by the Brooking Institution, Kharis Templeman of Stanford University says that "Taiwan will hold its presidential and legislative elections on January 11, 2020 ... [that's just hours from now] ... The incumbent president, Tsai Ing-wen of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), appears increasingly likely to prevail over her main challenger, Han Kuo-yu … Continue reading Taiwan election

So, here we are …

... not even ten days into the 2020s. A century ago the "roaring '20s" dawned with the realization that the Treaty Of Versailles (28 June 1919) was so deeply flawed that Henry Cabot Lodge, a great and astute American statesman, who had advocated for American participation, on the allied side, in the First World War … Continue reading So, here we are …

But that may prove impossible.

John Ibitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, suggests that Justin Trudeau might want to try what former diplomat, national strategic planner in the Privy Council Office,  and commentator David Mulroney refers to (on social media) as... ... "the "Ostrich" school of Canadian foreign policy."  It has, he says,  two pillars: First, "Canada has no … Continue reading But that may prove impossible.