It’s time (3)

A couple of days ago I said, “I want the Conservative Party to tell us how they plan to take Canada forward, to make Canada bigger and better.” We’re already a big country, geographically, the 2nd largest landmass in the world and we have the world’s longest coastline with seaports on three oceans and deep …

Doing the right thing

This article, in the Hindustan Times and this in the South China Morning Post, both deal with the same issue: China is trying to wear down Japan’s ability to assert sovereignty over the disputed Senkaku (尖閣諸島 in Japanese) or Diaoyutai (or Diaoyu Islands (釣魚臺列嶼 in Chinese) which are, in reality, little more than a few (eight) …

The Gretzky version

Professor Peter Harris (University of Colorado) suggests, in an article in Business Insider, that President-elect Biden will find it difficult, likely impossible to achieve anything like bipartisan support for his foreign policy. Even many Democrats, Professor Harris, says will not accept Biden’s views. Instead, he argues, President-elect Biden should borrow “from Wayne Gretzky, he should …

Biden’s world in 2021

Following on from yesterday’s discussion of what a Biden foreign policy might mean for Canada, I see, in The Economist, a very useful forecast signed* by Zanny Minton Beddoes, the Editor-in-chief of that journal that looks at the forces that might shape the post-COVID-19 and post-Trump world. She says that “Some years loom large in …

The Trump Effect (5)

Mark MacKinnon, the Globe and Mail’s senior international corespondent, says, in a recent article in that newspaper, that “No matter what happens on U.S. election day, no one will ever say that Donald Trump did not leave his mark on the world during his time as President of the United States.” I had hoped that …

Preparing for Cold War 2.0

Nadia Schadlow, who is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute and, most recently, was U.S. Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategy, has penned a useful article in Foreign Affairs in which she says that “No matter who is U.S. president come January, American policymakers will need to adopt new ideas about the country’s role in the …

Pushing the boundaries

I see in an article in The Economist that Russia is, once again, pushing the boundaries of internationally acceptable strategic conduct. The issue is that on 25 November 2019 Russia launched a satellite, Kosmos 2542. Then “Eleven days after its launch it disgorged another satellite, labelled Kosmos 2543 … [and, later] …  On July 15th, …

A G-something?

I said, almost two years ago, that leaders should be considering some sort of a Committee to Save the World. It’s a fairly popular idea in many academic circles, in several think tanks, and in a few governments. Now I see, in a very recent article in Foreign Affairs,  that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson …

A Biden Foreign Policy

There is an interesting, somewhat provocative, even hopeful article by Matthew Lee and Will Weissert of the Associated Press’ Washington bureau which is published in the Globe and Mail; it says that “Should former Vice-President Joe Biden win the White House in November, America will likely be in for a foreign policy about-face as Biden …

A foreign policy choice for Canada

So, two things caught my eye last week: first, in the Globe and Mail, John Ibbitson quoted a room full of (mostly young and über-bright) Canadian academics, all of whom are moaning about Canada’s foreign policy being off the rails; then, over in Foreign Affairs, a world-famous strategic thinker, Professor G John Ikenberry, from Princeton …