Preparing for Cold War 2.0

Nadia Schadlow, who is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute nd, most recently, was U.S. Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategy, has penned a useful article in Foreign Affairs in which she says that "No matter who is U.S. president come January, American policymakers will need to adopt new ideas about the country’s role in the … Continue reading Preparing for Cold War 2.0

Pushing the boundaries

I see in an article in The Economist that Russia is, once again, pushing the boundaries of internationally acceptable strategic conduct. The issue is that on 25 November 2019 Russia launched a satellite, Kosmos 2542. Then "Eleven days after its launch it disgorged another satellite, labelled Kosmos 2543 ... [and, later] ...  On July 15th, … Continue reading Pushing the boundaries

A G-something?

I said, almost two years ago, that leaders should be considering some sort of a Committee to Save the World. It's a fairly popular idea in many academic circles, in several think tanks, and in a few governments. Now I see, in a very recent article in Foreign Affairs,  that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson … Continue reading A G-something?

A Biden Foreign Policy

There is an interesting, somewhat provocative, even hopeful article by Matthew Lee and Will Weissert of the Associated Press' Washington bureau which is published in the Globe and Mail; it says that "Should former Vice-President Joe Biden win the White House in November, America will likely be in for a foreign policy about-face as Biden … Continue reading A Biden Foreign Policy

A foreign policy choice for Canada

So, two things caught my eye last week: first, in the Globe and Mail, John Ibbitson quoted a room full of (mostly young and über-bright) Canadian academics, all of whom are moaning about Canada's foreign policy being off the rails; then, over in Foreign Affairs, a world-famous strategic thinker, Professor G John Ikenberry, from Princeton … Continue reading A foreign policy choice for Canada

The real threat to world peace

Gideon Rachman, writing in the Financial Times, says that "The Sino-Soviet split was a critical moment in the cold war. A Sino-Indian split could be just as crucial to the “second cold war” that seems to be developing between the US and China. Until now, the Indian government, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, has … Continue reading The real threat to world peace

Climate apocalypse?

A  couple of days ago, I quoted the Globe and Mail's John Ibbitson who said, "in this century, conservatives have struggled to meet the challenge of climate change."  Perhaps that's because the "challenge" has been seriously overstated. Michael Shellenberger is a Time Magazine "Hero of the Environment," winner of the Green Book Award, and the … Continue reading Climate apocalypse?

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …

Don’t talk, Act!

I see in The Guardian that "seven former Conservative and Labour UK foreign secretaries have come together to declare ...[that] ... Britain must take the lead in co-ordinating the international response to China’s efforts to impose draconian security laws in Hong Kong." They have written a letter to UK Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab suggesting that … Continue reading Don’t talk, Act!

Doing the heavy lifting

Yesterday, I talked about standing up to China, the bully and restoring confidence in Canada. Today, I want to discuss how to do that. It's a bit disjointed, I'm afraid, because there are a lot of things wrong and fixing just one or two will not be enough. I said that Prime. Minister Justin Trudeau … Continue reading Doing the heavy lifting