Whither the SoCons?

Almost four years ago I suggested that there was room, on the Canadian political spectrum, for four national parties: Today’s NDP, with much better leadership, should, I suggested, be able to regularly win between 15 to 35 seats and even more, now and again;The centrist Liberal and the equally centrist Conservatives should, regularly, again, win…… Continue reading Whither the SoCons?

The end of the CPC?

There are those who believe that the Conservative Party of Canada suffers from some sort of political suicide ideation. There seem to be factions in the Party that are emotionally incapable of accepting any sort of compromise or moderation. The Campaign Life Coalition might be one of them. I see, in an article in the…… Continue reading The end of the CPC?

Confirmation bias

This post is an almost perfect example of confirmation bias. I agree, as I said yesterday, pretty much fully, with almost everything that Andrew MacDougall said in a recent article in Macleans’s magazine and I’m going to inflict his views, with my comments, on you, too. First: Derek Sloan finished fourth in a four-person party…… Continue reading Confirmation bias

What matters

Following on from yesterday, and as I approach my next birthday (my 80th birthday is only a couple of years away) I have had recent occasion to reexamine some of my core beliefs. First, over the last 77+ years, I have lived and worked all over the world. One thing I learned is that ALL…… Continue reading What matters

What are we for?

Todd Purdom, who is an editor and political correspondent for Vanity Fair, reminded us, a dozen years ago, that the Rogers and Hammerstein musical ‘South Pacific’ had, then, some lessons for us. He reminded us, specifically, of the scene in which the American officers are trying to persuade the civilian planter, Emile De Becque to…… Continue reading What are we for?

How to lose the next election

Jonathan Kay, an excellent journalist and commentator, posted this on social media a couple of days ago: This is the full image: That is, I think, what we are watching the Democratic Party do in the United States this year. It is why I continue, quite confidently, to predict that Donald J Trump will be…… Continue reading How to lose the next election

Conservative leadership, again

There is a very useful survey, by John Ibbitson in the Globe and Mail, about three potential CPC leaders … … Jean Charest, Erin O’Toole and Pierre Poilievre. Mr Ibbitson, a keen and respected political observer says that: “Mr. O’Toole placed a respectable third in the 2017 leadership race. He has had a life outside…… Continue reading Conservative leadership, again

Making Conservatism work

Andrew Coyne, writing in the Globe and Mail a few days ago, after covering ground that I have covered, over and over again, said that: “The first and most important step, then, is for Conservatives to develop some elemental self-confidence; to accept that they are in the persuasion game, and that the answer to electoral…… Continue reading Making Conservatism work

Scheer’s dilemma

What did Andrew Scheer do in 2019? Well, for a start he led the Conservative Party to be the most popular party in Canada: CPC:                   6,240,000± votes / 34.34% of the popular vote; LPC:                   6,019,000± votes / 33.12% of the popular…… Continue reading Scheer’s dilemma

What the CPC didn’t do (3)

In an essay in the Globe and Mail, John Ibbitson dissects the recent election and, not surprisingly, concludes that the Conservative party may have been its own worst enemy. He focuses on three key issues: Climate change ~ and he quotes the estimable Lisa Raitt who said that “”It’s a litmus test … Climate change…… Continue reading What the CPC didn’t do (3)