Pushing the boundaries

I see in an article in The Economist that Russia is, once again, pushing the boundaries of internationally acceptable strategic conduct. The issue is that on 25 November 2019 Russia launched a satellite, Kosmos 2542. Then "Eleven days after its launch it disgorged another satellite, labelled Kosmos 2543 ... [and, later] ...  On July 15th, … Continue reading Pushing the boundaries

Why?

So, I see, in an article by Christopher Nardi in the National Post, that "The prime minister’s office and the finance minister’s both office refuse to say if Chief of Staff Katie Telford’s husband ever communicated with them since he became senior vice-president at a major private mortgage company that is now running the government’s … Continue reading Why?

Canadians are waking up

I see an interesting story on the Global News website which says that "Nearly half of Canadians would support an election being called if the federal watchdog finds Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to have violated the Conflict of Interest Act again over the WE charity affair, a new poll suggests ... [and] ... The survey by Leger and the Association … Continue reading Canadians are waking up

Lockheed Martin ups the ante

So I see a report from the always well informed Murray Brewster on the CBC News website which says that "One of the companies vying to build the air force's next generation of warplanes promises it can inject as much as $16.9 billion into the Canadian economy, even though its pitch to the Liberal government … Continue reading Lockheed Martin ups the ante

It’s time for a change

Arthur Schafer, who is a professor and the founding director of the Centre for Professional and Applied Ethics at the University of Manitoba says, in an opinion piece in the Globe and Mail, that  "Our Prime Minister denies a conflict-of-interest situation in the award of a multimillion dollar untendered contract to WE Charity. His Minister … Continue reading It’s time for a change

A couple of things …

... caught my eye today: First, in the National Post, we learn that "A company in Quebec has been awarded $133,486,868 in sole-sourced federal orders to manufacture PPE even though it didn’t have a factory in Canada ... [it seems that] ... AMD Medicom Inc. [my hyperlink added] was given the ten-year contract and some … Continue reading A couple of things …

Siberian tiger cubs

The Jamestown Foundation, which some experts describe as mainly non-partisan and relatively unbiased, has published an interesting article by Paul Goble in which he reminds us that "Russia east of the Urals comprises more than two-thirds of the Russian Federation but has only about one-fifth of that country’s population. It is where most of Russia’s … Continue reading Siberian tiger cubs

If we don’t stand for something, we’ll fall for anything … or so the Liberals hope, anyway

Paul Waldie, writing in the Globe and Mail about the rise and fall of the We Charity, quotes Prince Harry, speaking at a WE Day event in London, last year: "“You guys know if you don’t stand for something, you’ll fall for anything,” Harry told the screaming audience." And he's right, you know. That is … Continue reading If we don’t stand for something, we’ll fall for anything … or so the Liberals hope, anyway

A G-something?

I said, almost two years ago, that leaders should be considering some sort of a Committee to Save the World. It's a fairly popular idea in many academic circles, in several think tanks, and in a few governments. Now I see, in a very recent article in Foreign Affairs,  that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson … Continue reading A G-something?

Arrant nonsense

They're back! The same über-progressive, China appeasing, knee-jerk anti-American members of the Laurentian Elites who advised Prime Minister Trudeau to drop the extradition case against Meng Wanzhou are back with another demand: Canada, ⇐ Allan Rock and Lloyd Axworthy ⇒ say, in an opinion piece in the Globe and Mail, must tear up the Safe … Continue reading Arrant nonsense