The question …

… which I have been asking, on social media, for weeks …

Senator Leo Housakos

… is, finally, thanks to a Conservative Senator, out in the open: the Toronto Sun reports thatQuebec Senator Leo Housakos called Prime Minister Justin Trudeau a bribe taker in the We Charity scandal, prompting a chorus of “Shame! Shame!” from other senators in the chamber, according to Blacklock’s Reporter.

All I can say is that it’s about time that someone asked if a potential beach of one bit of Canada’s Criminal Code is what is driving what I refer to as a Watergate level coverup attempt …

… which, I fear, is needed by the Trudeau Liberals to conceal Watergate level wrongdoing by the prime minister of Canada. I say that “I fear” because no one, not even those of us who believe, very firmly, that Justin Trudeau is, for any number of reasons, totally unfit for high office, want to see any Canadian politician in handcuffs, again. But, IF, and it’s a Huge IF, there are reasonable grounds to suspect that the deal to give the WE Charity hundreds of millions of taxpayers’ dollars in a sole-source, un-tendered contract was tied, somehow, to the hundreds of thousands of dollars that the Kielburger brothers paid, in fees and expenses, to Prime Minister Trudeau’s family …

… then it must be investigated and his name needs to be cleared, or he must answer in a court of law.

The fact that Trudeau family members were paid (uniquely, it seems, because (almost?) all other speakers at WE Charity events were not paid) to speak seems indisputable. The question, the good question that Senator Housakos finally asked, is simple: was there some (any?) connection between the payments made to Prime Minister Trudeau’s family by the Kielburgers and the attempted award, by Prime Minister Trudeau’s government to the Kielburgers of millions and millions of dollars to manage a programme of dubious value? (And Prime Minister Trudeau admits that he was part of the cabinet discussion to award the contract, without competition). If the answer is “Yes,” then it appears that bribery may be an issue under § 121 of the Criminal Code (link above).

As I said, no one wants to see the prime minister of Canada in a criminal court answering bribery charges, much less does anyone want to see Justin Trudeau in jail … unless he did something very, very wrong. Senator Housakos has asked the right question, the question that has been on many minds, not just his and mine: is the prime minister a crook? I hope he’s not … but I have real difficulty in understanding the stonewalling, the redacted documents, the prorogation of parliament, the filibustering of committees and so on IF there is not Watergate level wrongdoing that the Trudeau Liberals need to hide.

Well, the question has been asked. Now let’s wait to see if there are any convincing answers. But, I see that Prime Minister Trudeau says that his government’s recent economic update will be a “confidence” measure for Parliament. In other words he is, once again, threatening a spring election.

Why would he want an election?

Well he watched Premiers Higgs (NB) and Horgan (BC) run pandemic elections and turn their legislative minorities into safe majorities, and he watched Premier Scott Moe increase his majority in Saskatchewan and now the polls suggest that the Liberals have the support of something between 34 and 39% of voters, and 38% is majority territory. If Prime Minister Trudeau can win a majority then he can, for four years, anyway, continue the coverup. Majorities in our Westminster type of parliamentary democracy give the government great power to control the agenda. Given a generally (not completely, I hasten to say) compliant media, I suspect that a Trudeau majority would mean that the whole WE Charity issue and Senator Housakos’ good question will be swept under the rug.

By Ted Campbell

Old, retired Canadian soldier, Conservative ~ socially moderate, but a fiscal hawk. A husband, father and grandfather. Published material is posted under the "Fair Dealing" provisions (§29) of the Copyright Act for the purposes of research, private study and education.

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