Don’t overreact

I wear a poppy in the week leading up to Remembrance Day … for obvious reasons that regular readers will understand.

I’m not a member of the Royal Canadian Legion. I don’t dislike the Legion, in fact, I agree that it does a lot of good work for veterans and for the community, but I have never felt comfortable there and on the very occasional visit ~ several years ago was my last one ~ I found no veterans at all, almost everyone I met had Legion medals but no military service at all. I’m told, by friends, that many people of my age and younger also do not connect with the Legion.

I actively oppose the Royal Canadian Legion‘s efforts (supported by Veterans Affairs Canada) to rebrand Remembrance Day as some sort of pale, cheap imitation of the American Veteran’s Day. As I have said (and will say again, soon), I would welcome a Veterans Day, for those who self-identify as veterans (I do not, I call myself an old, retired soldier) but NOT, ever, under any circumstance on 11 November when we remember those who died in our country’s service and nothing else at all.

But I see a rising tide of anger against Whole Foods, where someone, someone in middle, not top management I suspect, made a silly decision to ban the poppy because it’s not part of their dress code. I expect that decision to be reversed in hours, if it hasn’t already been while I’m typing.

Every years this sort of thing happens ~ some chain say “No Legion poppy boxes” or something like that, and every year the decision gets turned around. But the anger seems, to me, to have little to so with Remembrance Day, so let’s not overreact.

Let’s remember, please, why we really have Remembrance Day

Anglonautes > English vocabulary > War / words > Remembrance

… and it’s got precious little to do with poppies.

Published by Ted Campbell

Old, retired Canadian soldier, Conservative ~ socially moderate, but a fiscal hawk. A husband, father and grandfather. Published material is posted under the "Fair Dealing" provisions (§29) of the Copyright Act for the purposes of research, private study and education.

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