It’s National Indigenous Peoples Day

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau reminds us that … … it is National Indigenous Peoples Day. Maybe our man-child prime minister will explain why he wasted so much taxpayer’s money on his unsuccessful vanity project ~ a failed quest for a worthless, temporary, second-class seat on the United Nations Security Council ~ which included sending millionsContinue reading “It’s National Indigenous Peoples Day”

A personal reflection (4) on values and principles

I’d like to tell you a little bit about a young friend (I hope she’ll agree that’s not too strong a word). She’s a twenty-something who lives in Hong Kong. Like many of her friends and fellow citizens, she is often out in the streets protesting the Beijing regime’s attacks on democracy, freedom and theContinue reading “A personal reflection (4) on values and principles”

Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur’s idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says thatContinue reading “Boring, but vital”

I don’t often disagree …

… with Norman Spector, he is a man of HUGE accomplishments, an author, diplomat and very senior public servant, who always takes a reasoned approach to situations. But this time, I must. Mr Spector said … … and I think he’s wrong. I think Canadians should be quietly applauding today because Canada “dodged a bullet,”Continue reading “I don’t often disagree …”

An important anniversary

Two hundred and five years ago the fate of the world hung in the balance. Napolean Boneparte, a master tactician but, fortunately, a deeply flawed strategist, had returned from exile, recreated his Army and was threatening to topple Europe, again, and impose his very, very illiberal rule on the continent. Happily, the Duke Of WellingtonContinue reading “An important anniversary”

Why does this not surprise me?

This article in the National Post just caused me (and many of my friends and former colleagues with, in total, centuries of experience in National Defence Headquarters)  to shrug. You might have looked for at least an eye-roll, but, no, all it rated was a shrug. What didn’t surprise anyone? Well, according to the CanadianContinue reading “Why does this not surprise me?”

Not so fast

The Economist, looking forward to the US November elections, says “Four months ago, Donald Trump’s odds of winning a second term had never looked better. After an easy acquittal in his impeachment trial, his approval rating had reached its highest level in three years, and was approaching the upper-40s range that delivered re-election to George W.Continue reading “Not so fast”

Not inconsistent

I wrote, just yesterday, that, in my opinion, real Conservatives are free traders. Protectionists like Donald Trump, are not conservatives, at all … they are horses of other colours entirely. But earlier I wrote, somewhat approvingly, of President Trump’s notion of America being self-sufficient. His views, I suggested, marked a fundamental shift away from ourContinue reading “Not inconsistent”

Three Ps

John Kirk, who is a professor of Latin American studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and Stephen Kimber, a professor of journalism at the University of King’s College, which is one of Canada’s oldest universities (founded in 1789), have written a fairly tame critique of Canada’s foreign policy for the CBC‘s Opinion section. They lookContinue reading “Three Ps”