A question for Prime Minister Trudeau

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It’s a simple enough question, Sir. Are the people of Hong Kong not worthy of their freedom? Is there something fundamentally wrong with them? Is there some reason that you have not joined hands with US President Trump and condemned China’s actions in destroying the “one country, two systems” regime that was supposed to protect Hong Kong for a half-century while, we hoped, China reformed itself? Is there some reason you have not joined UK Prime Minister Johnson and offered Hong Kong people an expedited path to Canadian citizenship? Is there something more important happening in the world today?

It cannot be the COVID-19 crisis. Your government is almost irrelevant; the provincial premiers are in charge of everything that matters; the only thing you’ve been doing is borrowing money to throw at anyone who will stand still for it. I see you even want to get involved in setting federal standards for nursing homes. Do you know how stupid that sounds, Sir? I mean why not federal standards for driving licences or for the sale of alcohol? I’d be all in favour, actually, if you would give away some federal powers so that your cabinet will have room to consider things Screen Shot 2020-06-04 at 15.59.21like nursing home management. Maybe one of the provinces should look after fiscal policy ~ let’s give that to Ontario, Rod Phillips could not possibly get us into a deeper hole than you and Bill Morneau have done. And defence policy ~ I think any of Alberta Premier Jason Kenney’s ministers could do a better job than you and Harjit Sajjan have done. And how about the environment? ~ let’s give that to Québec, maybe the provincial government can make Montréal stop dumping billions (yes, Sir, that’s billions) of gallons (not just litres, Sir, gallons) of raw sewage into our rivers, you have been unable to make them stop. Give border control to anyone ~ your government is, clearly, unable to look after anything to do with our borders. You kept them open for stupid reasons, allowing the coronavirus to enter Canada ~ thousands died here compared to only a handful in Australia; and don’t been ask us to think about illegal migrants. Anyone could control our borders better than your government. Then, after you’ve divested yourself of your real responsibilities, you might have the capacity to deal with standards for long term care homes.

If it’s not the coronavirus, then why are we kowtowing to China?

Is it that silly, worthless, temporary, second class seat on the United Nations Security Council? Is that why you support third-rate dictators who believe that capital punishment is appropriate for homosexuality when they want your vote against one of the very few liberal democracies anywhere between Austria and India? Is that why you are sucking up to Xi Jinping, Sir?

Is that why you have brought Canada to its knees? Is that why we are not acting in concert with our traditional allies, the other great democracies? Is your vanity project making us turn our back on the values for which millions fought and 100,000 died in battle?

The Globe and Mail, in an editorial, says, “Once again, Beijing is forcing the democratic world to rise up in defence of Hong Kong, and to demand that China keep its word. It’s not too late to fight back.” The Good Grey Globe‘s editorial writers are speaking for Canada, Sir. Are you listening?

Oliver_cromwell_imrpisoning_king_charles_ISir, does the year 1653 mean anything to you? Do you know what happens to governments that become useless and act against the best interests of the people? They are sent packing, Sir. Someone finally cleans the Augean stables and then cries out to people like you, “In the name of God, go!

 

 

One thought on “A question for Prime Minister Trudeau

  1. Ted

    French history is different – 1653 in France (courtesy of wiki) – The King won. Parliament lost.

    The Fronde (French pronunciation: ​[fʁɔ̃d])[1] was a series of civil wars in France between 1648 and 1653, occurring in the midst of the Franco-Spanish War, which had begun in 1635. King Louis XIV confronted the combined opposition of the princes, the nobility, the law courts (parlements), and most of the French people, and yet won out in the end. The dispute started when the government of France issued seven fiscal edicts, six of which were to increase taxation. The parlements pushed back and questioned the constitutionality of the King’s actions and sought to check his powers.[2]

    The Fronde was divided into two campaigns, the Parlementary Fronde and the Fronde of the Princes.[3] The timing of the outbreak of the Parlementary Fronde, directly after the Peace of Westphalia (1648) that ended the Thirty Years’ War, was significant. The nuclei of the armed bands that terrorized parts of France under aristocratic leaders during this period had been hardened in a generation of war in Germany, where troops still tended to operate autonomously. Louis XIV, impressed as a young ruler with the experience of the Fronde, came to reorganize French fighting forces under a stricter hierarchy whose leaders ultimately could be made or unmade by the King. Cardinal Mazarin blundered into the crisis but came out well ahead at the end. The Fronde represented the final attempt of the French nobility to do battle with the king, and they were humiliated. In the long-term, the Fronde served to strengthen royal authority, but weakened the economy. The Fronde facilitated the emergence of absolute monarchy.[4]

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