It’s about time

So, I see in the Globe and Mail, in a story datelined at about 5:00PM EST on 21 February, that “Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is calling for an immediate end to rail blockades, noting his government’s calls for dialogue with Indigenous protesters have been ignored and the patience of Canadians is wearing thin.” A small…… Continue reading It’s about time

I’m repeating this …

… with little in the way of comment because I found it very informative and enlightening. It is a ‘Twitter rant’ by Margareta Dovgal, who is the Policy, Research and Strategy Manager at Headwater Strategy Group in Vancouver. She began with this … … and then she continues: “This is a *consensus-based participatory democracy.* That…… Continue reading I’m repeating this …

Irish unity?

Ever since the Brexit became a reality (when Boris Johnson won a solid majority), I have wondered about the fates of Ireland and Scotland. Now, The Economist has taken up the issue in an article in the most recent edition. “For most of the century since Ireland gained independence from Britain,” the article says, “control…… Continue reading Irish unity?

This will not solve anything

So, I see that another barricade was erected near Edmonton by another group claiming to stand with the unelected hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation, another judge issued another injunction, another premier said the law will be enforced, another police force hummed and hawed, but this time, according to Global News, something was different.…… Continue reading This will not solve anything

Thumb on the scales (2)

Back about six months ago I accused the Trudeau-Freeland Liberals of having their figurative thumb on the scales of electoral politics as ministers crisscrossed the country in the pre-writ period, making spending announcements with great fanfare, when government departments and political parties are forbidden to advertise. Now I see, in an article in the Globe…… Continue reading Thumb on the scales (2)

I’m sorry to say that Andrew Coyne is wrong

Andrew Coyne, writing in the Globe and Mail, says that “In the 12 days or so since the Coastal GasLink pipeline dispute blew up from a localized confrontation in the British Columbia interior to a national crisis, two schools of thought have predominated: The first holds that the protests that have blocked rail lines and…… Continue reading I’m sorry to say that Andrew Coyne is wrong

The 5G dilemma

In the midst of the turmoil caused by climate-activists shutting down important parts of the Canadian economy, and Justin Trudeau’s ongoing failure to even try to act like a grownup, much less like a leader, other issues are liable to be forgotten. But, I see, according to an article in the Globe and Mail, that…… Continue reading The 5G dilemma

Great idea! Can it work in Canada?

So, I saw this on social media: According to the Guardian, a reputable albeit somewhat progressive journal, “The [Australian] freight rail operator Aurizon has launched legal action against five environmental activists and is seeking $375,000 in compensation for a series of recent protests that stopped coal trains … [and] … Aurizon lodged a statement of claim…… Continue reading Great idea! Can it work in Canada?

Divisions

Mark Joseph is an American multimedia producer (I’m not exactly sure what that means, I know what the words mean, I just don’t know how a multimedia production differs from, say, a film or a TV show), talk-show host, columnist, author and publisher, about whom I knew absolutely nothing until I stumbled upon an article…… Continue reading Divisions

Justin Trudeau has ceded the right to govern

Derek Burney, who, over a long and distinguished career, has been a diplomat, political strategist, business executive and teacher, too, writes, in the National Post, that “It is times like this when Lucien Bouchard’s claim that “Canada is not a real country” has an eerie ring of truth. Protesters of many stripes have the upper…… Continue reading Justin Trudeau has ceded the right to govern