Another costly and unnecessary delay

Lee Berthiaume of the Canadian Press, in an article published in the National Post, writes that “Canada’s long-running effort to buy new fighter jets is facing another delay … [because] … The federal government announced Tuesday it is giving jet makers another three months to submit their proposals for replacing Canada’s aging CF-18s. Companies were […]

Afghanistan in retrospect (3) (the Future?)

Following on from the other day, Dr Carter Malkasian writes, in Foreign Affairs, that in 2015 and 2016 the war in Afghanistan went from bad to worse for the US-supported Afghan government. That rejuvenated Taliban went from victory to victory, from strength to strength. Then, “When President Donald Trump took office in January 2017, the […]

Not as bad as it looks

Murray Brewster, writing for CBC News, says that “The federal government has spent slightly more than $1.01 billion over the last seven years on design and preparatory contracts for the navy’s new frigates and supply ships — and the projects still haven’t bought anything that floats … [and he adds] … It’s an enormous amount of […]

A vital step

The Financial Times reports that “Boris Johnson has warned he is ready to walk away from trade talks with the EU and sacrifice the interests of British business if Brussels insists on a deal that compromises the UK’s ability to set its own rules.” In effect, Prime Minister Johnson has fired “a warning shot [at] […]

Afghanistan in retrospect (2) (History)

A few weeks ago I commented on the long (2001 to 2014) Afghanistan campaign … one hesitates to call it a war; the Canadian Forces were, pretty clearly, at war; Canada was, equally clearly, not. It was Canada’s largest and most costly, in both blood and treasure, military operation since Korea (1950 to 1953) but […]

Another kick in the groin … and we need to recover

I see an article by Robert Fife and Marieke Walsh in the Globe and Mail which says that “Teck Resources Ltd. is pulling its application for the massive Frontier oil sands mine in Alberta, citing the need for Canada to finalize its climate-change policies and determine how resource development fits within them … [and] … After […]

It’s about time (another one)

So, I see, on CBC News and in the Globe and Mail, that “The Ontario Provincial Police have began to remove demonstrators from the camp near Belleville, Ont., where protests by the Mohawks of Tyendinaga have shut down passenger and freight train traffic for more than two weeks … [and] … At 8:15 on Monday […]

Well, isn’t that a kick in the virtue signal?

Lorrie Goldstein, writing in the Toronto Sun, says that “While Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he wants Canada to lead the world in reducing industrial greenhouse gas emissions linked to climate change, the country that led the world in doing it last year was President Donald Trump’s United States … [and, he adds] … the […]

Resetting our foreign policy

It is no secret, I think, to anyone who follows this blog that I regard Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau’s white paper on foreign policy, ‘A Foreign Policy for Canadians,’ as having been an act of policy vandalism. I continue to believe that Pierre Trudeau was driven by an intense need to find a way to […]

Getting it half right

The CBC’s Aaron Wherry gets two important points right in an analysis of Justin Trudeau’s climb down or change of heart or whatever it was yesterday: First, he says that Canada has “demonstrated that there’s a significant well of public willingness to pursue reconciliation with the Indigenous peoples who originally occupied the land that is […]