The Throne Speech

Remember just a couple of months ago? The mainstream media, in the summer and, especially during the election campaign in September,  when the Globe and Mail said “with an economy that’s generally healthier than how he found it, despite large deficits, Mr. Trudeau can still craft a message of stability and prosperity for the “middle class” voters,” and October, when Global News said that “the big-picture economic data paints a rosy picture of strong job growth, near-record low unemployment” was brimming with confidence about the Canadian economy. Canadians, Global News admitted (third link), were worried, but the analysts were not.

Back in October, less than a week before most Canadians went  to the polls, Paul Wells, in MacLean’s magazine, outlined the choices: “if, like a great many Canadians, you believe the climate crisis can no longer wait, while the fiscal crisis is not yet urgent, then the choice is clear.” I disagreed, and I said that Paul Wells is wrong.

In fact, a lot of Canadians agreed with me. More of them voted for Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives than voted for Justin Trudeau’s Liberals … but when the votes were tallied 10 million Canadians voted for some mix of climate action and fiscal irresponsibility, 1.3 million voted for Québec über alles and only 6 million voted for an economically sound, balanced platform.

Now we see this, in the Globe and Mail: “Canada’s labour market recorded its worst month for job losses in more than a decade with roughly 71,000 positions shed in the month of November … [and] … The unemployment rate ticked higher to 5.9 per cent, from 5.5 per cent in October, Statistics Canada said in its Labour Force Survey.

What happened?

Did the media lie? Were they, as some Neandercons argued earning their $6 Billion bailout by covering up the fact that the world economy is slowing, including in Canada, and that we may be sliding towards an (already overdue?) recession? Or did something happen in the last week of October that changed everything? I don’t know.

But, I wondered, the day after the election if Huskey Energy might have waited until the days after the election to announce job cuts in Calgary because they were hoping against hope that Canadians might elect a fiscally sensible government. Now I think Huskey and others can see the situation more clearly and they will send even more Canadians to the unemployment line and they get ready to face a recession.

Yesterday, I said that we should risk trade retaliation from China in order to stand up for our principles. I said it was “A risk worth taking.” Now, I see on CTV News, that “President Donald Trump has once again hinted at a possible trade spat with Canada and other NATO countries that he believes aren’t “putting up their money” on defence spending … [the American president] … spoke in Washington, D.C. on Thursday in front of representatives of the United Nations Security Council and said he had a productive meeting with the leaders of the nine countries who already spend two per cent of their gross domestic product on defence … [but, he added] … “Some (countries are) really not close and we may have to do something with trade,” he said at the meeting. “It’s not fair that they get U.S. protection. They’re not putting up their money.”” I don’t know how badly either or both of American and Chinese trade actions might hurt us as our industries are shedding jobs.

What I do know is that every copy of Thursday’s Throne Speech needs to be shredded, throne2.001pulped and then repurposed by forming the resultant mass into 10cm wide strips, perforating it every 10 cm and putting them on rollers and, then, eventually to better use. The Trudeau Liberal “plan” that promises “tax cuts, gun bans and climate action” is rubbish.

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