Voting

This article on the CBC News website and this item on social media …

Screen Shot 2019-10-09 at 11.45.49

… both raise the issue of how people identify themselves to vote.

No one, I hope, wants to make it too hard to vote, but, I think, that politicians, especially Liberal politicians and the bureaucracy want to make it too easy.

Our courts, for example, said, in 2002, that convicted felons serving a prison term have a constitutional right to vote. I believe that the Supreme Court erred in its judgement and I believe that the Government of Canada should do what it can to deny the right to vote to felons who have not completed a sentence, who are, in other words, either incarcerated or on parole. I believe that a convicted felon should be allowed to vote again once her or his complete sentence has been completed.

Only citizens must vote. That seems simple enough but why one must ask are non-citizens on the voters’ list? I think the next government needs to give Elections Canada a thorough, top-top-bottom housecleaning. Elections Canada is perceived by at least some in Ottawa to be a bit of dumping ground for bureaucrats. If that’s true then the bureaucrats and Canada are being poorly served. It will cost time and money to shake-up the system but it should be done.

Voters should be required to identify themselves, but that’s hard to do for many. Not everyone has a driving licence which, in some provinces, is the only piece of photo-ID that has an address on it. Perhaps Canada should help the provinces to develop new, voluntary, photo-ID cards, perhaps multi-function cards (driving licence, health card, even university student card, and general-purpose photo ID card, all-in-one, or, perhaps Canada could issue a voluntary photo-ID card, with an address on it, that can be updated, at low cost, when one moves ~ a ‘Canada Card‘ could be a smart-card that includes proof of citizenship.

viclarge_e_newIn any event, before voting one should be required to provide proof of identity, which includes removing face coverings and some proof of entitlement to vote ~ either proof of citizenship or a voter registration card that can be trusted.

No matter what your views on voting, please go out an do so, as long as you, young or old, progressive or conservative or undecided, are legally allowed to do so. The advance polls open in the morning on 11 October. Please be a part of our democratic process and vote for the candidate that you believe will best represent you and your community in the House of Commons.

2 thoughts on “Voting

  1. Concur: although I can’t substantiate your rather harsh judgement of Elections Canada officials. A voluntary citizenship card (one used to be issued to immigrants on the award of citizenship, and those of us who were merely Canada-born were jealous) as proof of citizenship might suffice for entry to the US by land: I thought that the GoC abrogated its responsibility when it fell to the provinces to issue that proof in the form of enhanced driver’s licences. And, while I’m on a roll, the idea of lowering the voting age to 16 is not only crazy it’s dangerous – I’m not happy about 18; and I voted when I was 18.

  2. New comment: I like your advice to vote for “the candidate who will best represent you…”. We have lost the Westminster idea of representative government. Unfortunately we are now obliged to vote for, in effect, the PM; for executive government without even the checks and balances of our neighbours.

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