Dealing with Da’esh/ISIL/ISIS Canadian “fighters”

On the CBC TV programme Power and Politics (story starts at about 1’30”) Public Safety goodaleMinister Ralph Goodale said that ““Canada does not engage in death squads” … “With the battlefield activity winding down, there is a very real question about where the foreign fighters go, and all of our allies, whether they’re in the Five Eyes or the G7, we’ve all agreed to collaborate very carefully,” … [and] … Goodale said anyone who poses a terrorist risk, homegrown or from elsewhere, is viewed “with the greatest of seriousness” by Canada’s intelligence, security and police agencies.

CBC News also reports that Canada’s “Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan said his department’s job is ensuring foreign fighters don’t become a threat … [and] … “We will make sure that we put every type of resource into place so Canadians are well protected,” he told a crowd at the Halifax International Security Forum on Friday.

What does that mean?

Minister Goodale says that (2’50”) that anyone who poses a threat is “treated with the greatest of seriousness” which appears to mean they may be tracked, evidence could be collected, criminal charges might be laid, passports could be lifted and we might monitor their behaviour, but, unlike our allies, including Australia and Britain, we do not try to kill Da’esh/ISIL/ISIS CcjMWaoXIAAKBywfighters who are, right now, fighting against us and our allies overseas. Minister Goodale repeats (5’40”) a popular Trudeau meme by saying that “if you engage in behaviours similar to that of the terrorists [by killing them, presumably] you let them win.” This is in contrast to what Rory Stewart, a U.K. cabinet minister, said about how Britain deals with UK residents, including citizens, who choose to leave the country to join ISIS, according to the CBC News story: “I’m afraid we have to be serious about the fact these people are a serious danger to us, and unfortunately the only way of dealing with them will be, in almost every case, to kill them,” Stewart told BBC Radio’s John Pienaar last month … [and] … Stewart, a former diplomat, continued: “These are people who are executing people … who have held women and children hostage, who are torturing and murdering, trying, by violence, to impose their will. Our response has to be, when somebody does that, I’m afraid, to deal with that” … [and, while] … Those words may sound chilling, but they reflect a country that’s suffered several brutal jihadi attacks in recent years, and sees jihadi returnees as a threat. Other countries [including Australia] have come to the same conclusion.

Why isn’t Canada doing something similar?

First, Mr Goodale is quite correct to say that we don’t send out “death squads” ~ I am 99.9% certain that there is something in military law and I’m 100% sure that there is something in military ethics that makes it impossible for a Canadian Forces commander ~ be she or he a corporal a colonel or a general ~ to order or for a soldier to carry out any sort of non-judicial execution.

Second, I believe that the Trudeau regime is afraid to alienate the Muslim-Canadian community.

Syrians-crucifiedIn my opinion there would be nothing wrong with hiring private military contractors to seek out and kill Da’esh/ISIL/ISIS “fighters” ~ if you call killing defenceless hostages “fighting” ~ in any place except Canada. That would include, specifically, Canadians (citizens or residents) who have left Canada to “fight” for Da’esh/ISIL/ISIS or similar barbaric-terrorist groups. It is something the government should so without much any publicity save for providing photos of the dead bodies to the families of those killed and to the leaders of mosques that are suspected of indoctrinating young men with pro Da’esh/ISIL/ISIS propaganda.

Treating returning terrorists as anything other that the most serious threats to national security is a dreadful mistake. A good first step would be to inter them all, without exception ~ there would be some legal challenges there, no doubt ~ and then stripping citizenship away from those not born here and deporting most of them. Those who cannot be killed or deported need to be locked away … probably for life.

 

 

2 thoughts on “Dealing with Da’esh/ISIL/ISIS Canadian “fighters””

  1. I can’t help but wonder when the law was no longer applicable…. I mean, it’s pretty clear no?

    Criminal Code of Canada
    Prohibited Activities

    Leaving Canada to commit offence for terrorist group

    83.201 Everyone who leaves or attempts to leave Canada, or goes or attempts to go on board a conveyance with the intent to leave Canada, for the purpose of committing an act or omission outside Canada that, if committed in Canada, would be an indictable offence under this or any other Act of Parliament for the benefit of, at the direction of or in association with a terrorist group is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term of not more than 14 years.

    2013, c. 9, s. 8.
    Marginal note:Leaving Canada to commit offence that is terrorist activity

    83.202 Everyone who leaves or attempts to leave Canada, or goes or attempts to go on board a conveyance with the intent to leave Canada, for the purpose of committing an act or omission outside Canada that, if committed in Canada, would be an indictable offence under this or any other Act of Parliament if the act or omission constituting the offence also constitutes a terrorist activity is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term of not more than 14 years.

    2013, c. 9, s. 8.

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